AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS
ANNA UNIVERSITY CHENNAI :: CHENNAI 600 113
Regulation 2008
CURRICULA AND SYLLABI FOR VI SEMESTER
B.E. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
SEMESTER VI
(Applicable to the students admitted from the Academic year 2008 – 2009 onwards)
SL.
No.
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
1. EE2351 Power System Analysis 3 0 0 3
2. EE2352 Solid State Drives 3 0 0 3
3. EE2353 High Voltage Engineering 3 0 0 3
4. EE2354 Microprocessors & Microcontroller 3 1 0 4
5. EE2355 Design of Electrical Machines 3 0 0 3
6. CS2361 Computer Networks 3 1 0 4
7. E1 Elective I 3 0 0 3
PRACTICAL
1.
EE2356
Microprocessor and Micro controller
Laboratory
0 0 3 2
2. EE2357 Presentation Skills and Technical Seminar 0 0 2 1
TOTAL 21 2 5 26
B.E ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
LIST OF ELECTIVES - R 2010
ELECTIVE I
SL.NO CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
1. EE2021 Fibre Optics and Laser Instruments 3 0 0 3
2. CS2021 Visual Languages and Applications 3 1 0 4
3. EE2022 Advanced Control System 3 0 0 3
4. EE2023 Robotics & Automation 3 0 0 3
5. GE2021 Professional Ethics in Engineering 3 0 0 3
6. EE2027 Power System Transients 3 0 0 3
L T P C


EE2351 POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS 3 0 0 3
AIM
To understand the necessity and to become familiar with the modelling of power
system and components. And to apply different methods to analyse power system
for the purpose of system planning and operation.
OBJECTIVES
i. To model the power system under steady state operating condition. To apply efficient
numerical methods to solve the power flow problem.
ii. To model and analyse the power systems under abnormal (or) fault conditions.
iii. To model and analyse the transient behaviour of power system when it is subjected
to a fault.
1. INTRODUCTION 9
Modern power system (or) electric energy system - Analysis for system planning and
operational studies – basic components of a power system. Generator models -
transformer model – transmission system model - load representation. Single line
diagram – per phase and per unit representation – change of base. Simple building
algorithms for the formation of Y-Bus matrix and Z-Bus matrix.
2. POWER FLOW ANALYSIS 9
Importance of power flow analysis in planning and operation of power systems.
Statement of power flow problem - classification of buses into P-Q buses, P-V
(voltage-controlled) buses and slack bus. Development of Power flow model in
complex variables form and polar variables form.
Iterative solution using Gauss-Seidel method including Q-limit check for voltagecontrolled
buses – algorithm and flow chart.
Iterative solution using Newton-Raphson (N-R) method (polar form) including Q-limit
check and bus switching for voltage-controlled buses - Jacobian matrix elements –
algorithm and flow chart.
Development of Fast Decoupled Power Flow (FDPF) model and iterative solution –
algorithm and flowchart;
Comparison of the three methods.
3. FAULT ANALYSIS – BALANCED FAULTS 9
Importance short circuit (or) for fault analysis - basic assumptions in fault analysis of
power systems.
Symmetrical (or) balanced three phase faults – problem formulation – fault analysis
using Z-bus matrix – algorithm and flow chart. Computations of short circuit capacity,
post fault voltage and currents.
4. FAULT ANALYSIS – UNBALANCED FAULTS 9
Introduction to symmetrical components – sequence impedances – sequence
networks – representation of single line to ground, line to line and double line to
ground fault conditions.
Unbalanced fault analysis - problem formulation – analysis using Z-bus impedance
matrix – (algorithm and flow chart.).

5. STABILITY ANALYSIS 9
Importance of stability analysis in power system planning and operation -
classification of power system stability - angle and voltage stability – simple
treatment of angle stability into small-signal and large-signal (transient) stability
Single Machine Infinite Bus (SMIB) system: Development of swing equation - equal
area criterion - determination of critical clearing angle and time by using modified
Euler method and Runge-***** second order method. Algorithm and flow chart.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Hadi Saadat, ‘Power System Analysis’, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company, New
Delhi, 2002.
2. Olle. I. Elgerd, ‘Electric Energy Systems Theory – An Introduction’, Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, Second Edition, 2003.
REFERENCES
1. P. Kundur, ‘Power System Stability and Control, Tata McGraw Hill, Publications,
1994.
2. John J. Grainger and W.D. Stevenson Jr., ‘Power System Analysis’, McGraw Hill
International Book Company, 1994.
3. I.J. Nagrath and D.P. Kothari, ‘Modern Power System Analysis’, Tata McGraw-Hill
Publishing Company, New Delhi, 1990.
4. .K.Nagasarkar and M.S. Sukhija Oxford University Press, 2007.


EE2352 SOLID STATE DRIVES 3 0 0 3
AIM
To study and understand the operation of electric drives controlled from a power
electronic converter and to introduce the design concepts of controllers.
OBJECTIVES
• To understand the stable steady-state operation and transient dynamics of a
motor-load system.
• To study and analyze the operation of the converter / chopper fed dc drive and to
solve simple problems.
• To study and understand the operation of both classical and modern induction
motor drives.
• To understand the differences between synchronous motor drive and induction
motor drive and to learn the basics of permanent magnet synchronous motor
drives.
• To analyze and design the current and speed controllers for a closed loop solidstate
DC motor drive and simulation using a software package
1. DRIVE CHARACTERISTICS 9
Equations governing motor load dynamics - steady state stability - Multi
quadrant dynamics - Acceleration, deceleration, starting and stopping - load
torque characteristics of various drives.
2. CONVERTER / CHOPPER FED DC MOTOR DRIVE 9
Steady state analysis of the single and three phase fully controlled converter fed
separately excited D.C motor drive - Continuous and discontinuous conduction
Time ratio and current limit control - 4 quadrant operation of converter.
3. DESIGN OF CONTROLLERS FOR DRIVES 9
Transfer function for DC motor, load and converter – Closed loop control with
current and speed feedback - Armature voltage control and field weakening mode
control, Design of controllers: Current controller and speed controller - Converter
selection and characteristics - Use of simulation software package.
4. INDUCTION MOTOR DRIVES 9
Stator voltage control – energy efficient drive - v/f control, constant air-gap flux –
field weakening mode - voltage/current fed inverters - Block diagram of vector
control - closed loop control.
5. SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR DRIVES 9
V/f control and self-control of synchronous motor – Marginal angle control and
power factor control - Permanent magnet synchronous motor Black diagram of
closed loop control.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Gopal K.Dubey, “Power Semi conductor controlled drives “ Prentice Hall Inc., New
Jersey 1989.
2. Bimal K. Bose. ‘Modern Power Electronics and AC Drives’, PHI / Pearson
Education, 2002.
REFERENCES:
1. N.K.De and S.K.Sen Electrical Drices” PHI, 2006 9th print.
2. Murphy J.M.D. and Turnbull, “ Thyristor control of AC Motor” Pergamon Press Oxford
1988.


3. R. Krishnan, ‘Electric Motor & Drives Modeling, Analysis and Control’, Prentice Hall
of India, 2001.
L T P C
EE2353 HIGH VOLTAGE ENGINEERING 3 0 0 3
AIM
To expose the students to various types of over voltage transients in power
system and its effect on power system.
Generation of over voltages in laboratory.
Testing of power apparatus and system.
OBJECTIVES
i. To understand the various types of over voltages in power system and
protection methods.
ii. Generation of over voltages in laboratories.
iii. Measurement of over voltages.
iv. Nature of Breakdown mechanism in solid, liquid and gaseous dielectrics.
v. Testing of power apparatus and insulation coordination.
1. OVER VOLTAGES IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS 6
Causes of over voltages and its effects on power system – Lightning, switching surges
and temporary over voltages – protection against over voltages – Bewley’s lattice
diagram.
2. ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN GASES, SOLIDS AND LIQUIDS 10
Gaseous breakdown in uniform and non-uniform fields – Corona discharges – Vacuum
breakdown – Conduction and breakdown in pure and commercial liquids – Breakdown
mechanisms in solid and composite dielectrics.
3. GENERATION OF HIGH VOLTAGES AND HIGH CURRENTS 10
Generation of High DC, AC, impulse voltages and currents. Tripping and control of
impulse generators.
4. MEASUREMENT OF HIGH VOLTAGES AND HIGH CURRENTS 10
Measurement of High voltages and High currents – Digital techniques in high voltage
measurement.
5. HIGH VOLTAGE TESTING & INSULATION COORDINATION 9
High voltage testing of electrical power apparatus – Power frequency, impulse voltage
and DC testing – International and Indian standards – Insulation Coordination.


TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. M. S. Naidu and V. Kamaraju, ‘High Voltage Engineering’, Tata McGraw Hill,
3rd Edition, 2004.
REFERENCES
1. E. Kuffel and W. S. Zaengel, ‘High Voltage Engineering Fundamentals’, Pergamon
Press, Oxford, London, 1986.
2. E. Kuffel and M. Abdullah, ‘High Voltage Engineering’, Pergamon Press, Oxford,
1970.
3. L. L. Alston, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, First Indian Edition, 2006.
LT P C
EE2354 MICROPROCESSORS AND MICRO CONTROLLER 3 1 0 4
AIM
To introduce Microprocessor Intel 8085 and 8086 and the Micro Controller 8051
OBJECTIVES
i. To study the Architecture of 8085 & 8086, 8051
ii. To study the addressing modes & instruction set of 8085 & 8051.
iii. To introduce the need & use of Interrupt structure 8085 & 8051.
iv. To develop skill in simple program writing for 8051 & 8085 and
applications
v. To introduce commonly used peripheral / interfacing ICs
1. 8085 and 8086 PROCESSOR 9
Hardware Architecture pintouts - Signals – Memory interfacing – I/O ports and
data transfer concepts – Timing Diagram – Interrupt structure.
2. PROGRAMMING OF 8085 PROCESSOR 9
Instruction format and addressing modes – Assembly language format – Data
transfer, data manipulation & control instructions – Programming: Loop structure
with counting & Indexing - Look up table - Subroutine instructions - stack.
3. PERIPHERAL INTERFACING 9
Study of Architecture and programming of ICs: 8255 PPI, 8259 PIC, 8251
USART, 8279 Key board display controller and 8253 Timer/ Counter – Interfacing
with 8085 - A/D and D/A converter interfacing.
4. 8051 MICRO CONTROLLER 9
Functional block diagram - Instruction format and addressing modes – Timing
Diagram Interrupt structure – Timer –I/O ports – Serial communication.


5. MICRO CONTROLLER PROGRAMMING & APPLICATIONS 9
Data Transfer, Manipulation, Control & I/O instructions – Simple programming
exercises key board and display interface – Closed loop control of servo motorstepper
motor control - Washing Machine Control.
L = 45 T = 15 Total = 60
TEXT BOOKS
1. “Microprocessor and Microcontrollers”, Krishna Kant Eastern Company Edition,
Prentice – Hall of India, New Delhi , 2007.
2. Muhammad Ali Mazidi & Janice Gilli Mazidi, R.D.Kinely ‘The 8051 Micro Controller
and Embedded Systems’, PHI Pearson Education, 5th Indian reprint, 2003.
REFERENCES
1. R.S. Gaonkar, ‘Microprocessor Architecture Programming and Application’, Wiley
Eastern Ltd., New Delhi.
2. The 8088 & 8086 Microprocessors , Walter A Tribal & Avtar Singh, Pearson, 2007,
Fourth Edition.
L T P C
EE2355 DESIGN OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES 3 0 0 3
AIM
To expose the students to the concept of design of various types of electrical
machines.
OBJECTIVES
To provide sound knowledge about constructional details and design of various
electrical machines.
i. To study mmf calculation and thermal rating of various types of electrical
machines.
ii. To design armature and field systems for D.C. machines.
iii. To design core, yoke, windings and cooling systems of transformers.
iv. To design stator and rotor of induction machines.
v. To design stator and rotor of synchronous machines and study their thermal
behaviour.
1. INTRODUCTION 9
Major considerations in Electrical Machine Design - Electrical Engineering Materials –
Space factor – Choice of Specific Electrical and Magnetic loadings - Thermal
considerations - Heat flow – Temperature rise - Rating of machines – Standard
specifications.


2. DC MACHINES 9
Output Equations – Main Dimensions - Magnetic circuit calculations – Carter’s
Coefficient - Net length of Iron –Real & Apparent flux densities – Selection of number of
poles – Design of Armature – Design of commutator and brushes – performance
prediction using design values.
3. TRANSFORMERS 9
Output Equations – Main Dimensions - KVA output for single and three phase
transformers – Window space factor – Overall dimensions – Operating characteristics –
Regulation – No load current – Temperature rise in Transformers – Design of Tank -
Methods of cooling of Transformers.
4. INDUCTION MOTORS 9
Output equation of Induction motor – Main dimensions – Length of air gap- Rules for
selecting rotor slots of squirrel cage machines – Design of rotor bars & slots – Design of
end rings – Design of wound rotor -– Magnetic leakage calculations – Leakage
reactance of polyphase machines- Magnetizing current - Short circuit current – Circle
diagram - Operating characteristics.
5. SYNCHRONOUS MACHINES 9
Output equations – choice of loadings – Design of salient pole machines – Short circuit
ratio – shape of pole face – Armature design – Armature parameters – Estimation of air
gap length – Design of rotor –Design of damper winding – Determination of full load field
mmf – Design of field winding – Design of turbo alternators – Rotor design.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Sawhney, A.K., 'A Course in Electrical Machine Design', Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New
Delhi, 1984.
2. Sen, S.K., 'Principles of Electrical Machine Designs with Computer Programmes',
Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1987.
REFERENCES
1. A.Shanmugasundaram, G.Gangadharan, R.Palani 'Electrical Machine Design Data
Book', New Age Intenational Pvt. Ltd., Reprint 2007.
L T P C
CS2361 COMPUTER NETWORKS 3 1 0 4
Unit I 9
Introduction to networks – network architecture – network performance – Direct link
networks – encoding – framing – error detection – transmission – Ethernet – Rings –
FDDI - Wireless networks – Switched networks – bridges
Unit II 9
Internetworking – IP - ARP – Reverse Address Resolution Protocol – Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol – Internet Control Message Protocol – Routing – Routing
algorithms – Addressing – Subnetting – CIDR – Inter domain routing – IPv6


Unit III 9
Transport Layer – User Datagram Protocol (UDP) – Transmission Control Protocol –
Congestion control – Flow control – Queuing Disciplines – Congestion
Avoidance Mechanisms.
Unit IV 9
Data Compression – introduction to JPEG, MPEG, and MP3 – cryptography –
symmetric-key – public-key – authentication – key distribution – key agreement – PGP –
SSH – Transport layer security – IP Security – wireless security - Firewalls
Unit V 9
Domain Name System (DNS) – E-mail – World Wide Web (HTTP) – Simple Network
Management Protocol – File Transfer Protocol (FTP)– Web Services -
Multimedia Applications – Overlay networks
L = 45 T = 15 TOTAL = 60


TEXT BOOK:
1.Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. Davie, “Computer Networks: A Systems Approach”,
Fourth Edition, Elsevier Publishers Inc., 2007.
REFERENCES:
1. James F. Kuross and Keith W. Ross, “Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach
Featuring the Internet”, Third Edition, Addision wesley, 2004.
2. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, “Computer Networks”, Fourth Edition, PHI, 2003.
3. William Stallings, “Data and Computer Communication”, Sixth Edition, Pearson
Education, 2000.
4. Nader F. Mir, ”Computer and communication networks”, Pearson Education, 2007.
L T P C
EE2356 MICROPROCESSOR AND MICRO CONTROLLER LABORATORY 0 0 3 2
AIM
1. To understand programming using instruction sets of processors.
2. To study various digital & linear
8-bit Microprocessor
1. Simple arithmetic operations: Multi precision addition / subtraction / multiplication
/ division.
2. Programming with control instructions: Increment / Decrement, Ascending /
Descending order, Maximum / Minimum of numbers,Rotate instructions
Hex / ASCII / BCD code conversions.
3. Interface Experiments:
• A/D Interfacing.
• D/A Interfacing.
• Traffic light controller.
4. Interface Experiments:
• Simple experiments using 8251, 8279, 8254.
8-bit Microcontroller
5. Demonstration of basic instructions with 8051 Micro controller execution,
including:
• Conditional jumps, looping
• Calling subroutines.
• Stack parameter testing
6. Parallel port programming with 8051 using port 1 facility:
• Stepper motor and D / A converter.
7. Study of Basic Digital IC’s
(Verification of truth table for AND, OR, EXOR, NOT, NOR, NAND, JK FF, RS
FF,D FF)
8. Implementation of Boolean Functions, Adder / Subtractor circuits.
9. Combination Logic; Adder, Subtractor, Code converters, Encoder and Decoder,
10. Sequential Logic; Study of Flip-Flop, Counters )synchronous and asynchronous),
Shift Registers


11. Op-Amp Linear Application: Comparator, Differentiator, Integrator, Adder,
Subtractor.
12. Op-amp Non Linear Application; Clipper, Clamper, Peak detector, Timer IC
application, VCO and PLL.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
REQUIREMENT FOR A BATCH OF 30 STUDENTS
S.No. Description of Equipment IC
number/code
Quantity
required
1. 8085 Microprocessor Trainer with
Power supply
- 15
2. 8051 Micro controller Trainer Kit with
power supply
- 15
3. 8255 Interface board - 5
4. 8251 Interface board - 5
5. 8259 Interface board - 5
6. 8279 Keyboard/Display Interface Board - 5
7. 8254 timer counter - 5
8. ADC and DAC card - 5
9. Stepper motor with Controller - 5
10. Traffic Light Control System - 5
11. Regulation power supply - 30
12. Universal ADD-ON modules - 5
13. 8 Digit Multiplexed Display Card - 5
14. Function Generator - 10
1. Multimeter - 20
2. C R O - 10


S.No. Description of Equipment IC
number/code
Quantity
required
17. Quad 2-input AND gate 7408 50
18. Quad 2-input OR gate 7432 50
19. Quad 2-input XOR gate 7486 50
20. Hex inverter/ NOT gate 7404 50
21 Quad 2-input NOR gate 7402 50
22. Quad 2-input NAND gate 7400 50
23. Dual J-K flip Flop with clear 7473 50
24. Dual D flip Flop with clear / preset 7474 50
25. 4 – bit Adder 7483 50
26. 4- bit Magnitude comparator 7485 50
27. BCD to 7-segment code converter 7447 50
28. 3 to 8 Decoder / Demultiplexer 74138 50
29. Decade / Modulo- n counter 7490 50
30. 4 – bit serial / parallel in/out shift register 7495 50
31. General purpose OPAMP 741 100
32. Timer 555 100
33. Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) 566 25
34. Phase Locked Loop (PLL) 565 25
35. Diode IN4007 25
36. Zener diode 5 volt 25
37. Light Emitting Diode (LED) LED 25
38. Resistors (quarter watt) : 10K, 33k ohm - 50 each
39. Capacitors : 0, 1uF, 0.01uF, 0.47uF - 50 each
40. Bread Board - 30


41. Single strand wire - 10 packet
42. Wire stripper - 10
L T P C
EE2357 PRESENTATION SKILLS AND TECHNICAL SEMINAR 0 0 2 1
OBJECTIVE
During the seminar session each student is expected to prepare and present a topic on
engineering/ technology, for a duration of about 8 to 10 minutes. In a session of three
periods per week, 15 students are expected to present the seminar. A faculty guide is
to be allotted and he / she will guide and monitor the progress of the student and
maintain attendance also.
Students are encouraged to use various teaching aids such as over head projectors,
power point presentation and demonstrative models. This will enable them to gain
confidence in facing the placement interviews.
L T P C
EE2021 FIBRE OPTICS AND LASER INSTRUMENTS 3 0 0 3
AIM
To contribute to the knowledge of Fibre optics and Laser Instrumentation and
its Industrial and Medical Application.
OBJECTIVES
i. To expose the students to the basic concepts of optical fibres and their
properties.
ii. To provide adequate knowledge about the Industrial applications of
optical fibres.
iii. To expose the students to the Laser fundamentals.
iv. To provide adequate knowledge about Industrial application of lasers.
v. To provide adequate knowledge about holography and Medical
applications of Lasers.
1. OPTICAL FIBRES AND THEIR PROPERTIES 9
Principles of light propagation through a fibre - Different types of fibres and their
properties, fibre characteristics – Absorption losses – Scattering losses –
Dispersion – Connectors and splicers – Fibre termination – Optical sources –
Optical detectors.
2. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION OF OPTICAL FIBRES 9


Fibre optic sensors – Fibre optic instrumentation system – Different types of
modulators – Interferometric method of measurement of length – Moire fringes –
Measurement of pressure, temperature, current, voltage, liquid level and strain.
3. LASER FUNDAMENTALS 9
Fundamental characteristics of lasers – Three level and four level lasers –
Properties of laser – Laser modes – Resonator configuration – Q-switching and
mode locking – Cavity damping – Types of lasers – Gas lasers, solid lasers,
liquid lasers, semiconductor lasers.
4. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION OF LASERS 9
Laser for measurement of distance, length, velocity, acceleration, current,
voltage and Atmospheric effect – Material processing – Laser heating, welding,
melting and trimming of material – Removal and vaporization.
5. HOLOGRAM AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS 9
Holography – Basic principle - Methods – Holographic interferometry and
application, Holography for non-destructive testing – Holographic components –
Medical applications of lasers, laser and tissue interactive – Laser instruments
for surgery, removal of tumors of vocal cards, brain surgery, plastic surgery,
gynaecology and oncology.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. J.M. Senior, ‘Optical Fibre Communication – Principles and Practice’, Prentice
Hall of India, 1985.
2. J. Wilson and J.F.B. Hawkes, ‘Introduction to Opto Electronics’, Prentice Hall of
India, 2001.
REFERENCES
1. G. Keiser, ‘Optical Fibre Communication’, McGraw Hill, 1995.
2. M. Arumugam, ‘Optical Fibre Communication and Sensors’, Anuradha Agencies,
2002.
3. John F. Read, ‘Industrial Applications of Lasers’, Academic Press, 1978.
4. Monte Ross, ‘Laser Applications’, McGraw Hill, 1968
L T P C
CS2021 VISUAL LANGUAGES AND APPLICATIONS 3 1 0 4
AIM
To study the principles and techniques of windows programming using MFC,
procedures, resources, controls and database programming through the visual
languages, Visual C++ and Visual Basic.
OBJECTIVES
i. To study about the concepts of windows programming models, MFC
applications, drawing with the GDI, getting inputs from Mouse and the
Keyboard.
ii. To study the concepts of Menu basics, menu magic and classic controls of
the windows programming using VC++.




iii. To study the concept of Document/View Architecture with single & multiple
document interface, toolbars, status bars and File I/O Serialization.
iv. To study about the integrated development programming event driven
programming, variables, constants, procedures and basic ActiveX controls in
visual basic.
v. To understand the database and the database management system, visual
data manager, data bound controls and ADO controls in VB.
1. FUNDAMENTALS OF WINDOWS AND MFC 9
Messages - Windows programming - SDK style - Hungarian notation and
windows data types - SDK programming in perspective.The benefits of C++ and
MFC - MFC design philosophy - Document/View architecture - MFC class
hierarchy - AFX functions. Application object - Frame window object - Message
map.
Drawing the lines – Curves – Ellipse – Polygons and other shapes. GDI pens –
Brushes - GDI fonts - Deleting GDI objects and deselecting GDI objects. Getting
input from the mouse: Client & Non-client - Area mouse messages - Mouse
wheel - Cursor. Getting input from the keyboard: Input focus - Keystroke
messages - Virtual key codes - Character & dead key messages.
2. RESOURCES AND CONTROLS 9
Creating a menu – Loading and displaying a menu – Responding to menu
commands – Command ranges - Updating the items in menu, update ranges –
Keyboard accelerators. Creating menus programmatically - Modifying menus
programmatically - The system menu - Owner draw menus – Cascading menus -
Context menus.
The C button class – C list box class – C static class - The font view application –
C edit class – C combo box class – C scrollbar class. Model dialog boxes –
Modeless dialog boxes.
3. DOCUMENT / VIEW ARCHITECTURE 9
The inexistence function revisited – Document object – View object – Frame
window object – Dynamic object creation. SDI document template - Command
routing. Synchronizing multiple views of a document – Mid squares application –
Supporting multiple document types – Alternatives to MDI. Splitter Windows:
Dynamic splitter window – Static splitter windows.
Creating & initializing a toolbar - Controlling the toolbar’s visibility – Creating &
initializing a status bar - Creating custom status bar panes – Status bar support
in appwizard. Opening, closing and creating the files - Reading & Writing – C file
derivatives – Serialization basics - Writing serializable classes.
4. FUNDAMENTALS OF VISUAL BASIC 10
Menu bar – Tool bar – Project explorer – Toolbox – Properties window – Form
designer – Form layout – Intermediate window. Designing the user interface:


Aligning the controls – Running the application – Visual development and event
driven programming.
Variables: Declaration – Types – Converting variable types – User defined data
types - Lifetime of a variable. Constants - Arrays – Types of arrays. Procedures:
Subroutines – Functions – Calling procedures. Text box controls – List box &
Combo box controls – Scroll bar and slider controls – File controls.
5. DATABASE PROGRAMMING WITH VB 8
Record sets – Data control – Data control properties, methods. Visual data
manager: Specifying indices with the visual data manager – Entering data with
the visual data manager. Data bound list control – Data bound combo box – Data
bound grid control. Mapping databases: Database object – Table def object,
Query def object.
Programming the active database objects – ADO object model – Establishing a
connection - Executing SQL statements – Cursor types and locking mechanism –
Manipulating the record set object – Simple record editing and updating.
L = 45 T = 15 TOTAL = 60
TEXT BOOKS
1. Jeff Prosise, ‘Programming Windows With MFC’, Second Edition, WP Publishers
& Distributors [P] Ltd, Reprinted 2002.
2. Evangelos Petroutsos, ‘Mastering Visual Basic 6.0’, BPB Publications, 2002.
REFENENCES
1. Herbert Schildt, ‘MFC Programming From the Ground Up’, Second Edition, Tata
McGraw Hill, reprinted 2002.
2. John Paul Muller, ‘Visual C++ 6 From the Ground Up Second Edition’, Tata
McGraw Hill, Reprinted 2002.
3. Curtis Smith & Micheal Amundsen, ‘Teach Yourself Database Programming with
Visual Basic 6 in 21 days’, Techmedia Pub, 1999.
L T P C
EE2022 ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEM 3 0 0 3
AIM
To gain knowledge in state variable analysis, non-linear systems and optimal
control.
OBJECTIVES
i To study the state variable analysis
ii To provide adequate knowledge in the phase plane analysis.
iii To give a basic knowledge in describing function analysis.
iv To analyze the stability of the systems using different techniques.
v To study the design of optimal controller.
1. STATE VARIABLE ANALYSIS 9


Concept of state – State Variable and State Model – State models for linear and
continuous time systems – Solution of state and output equation – controllability
and observability - Pole Placement – State observer Design of Control Systems
with observers.
2. PHASE PLANE ANALYSIS 9
Features of linear and non-linear systems - Common physical non-linearities –
Methods of linearising non-linear systems - Concept of phase portraits –
Singular points – Limit cycles – Construction of phase portraits – Phase plane
analysis of linear and non-linear systems – Isocline method.
3. DESCRIBING FUNCTION ANALYSIS 9
Basic concepts, derivation of describing functions for common non-linearities –
Describing function analysis of non-linear systems – Conditions for stability –
Stability of oscillations.
4. STABILITY ANALYSIS 9
Introduction – Liapunov’s stability concept – Liapunov’s direct method – Lure’s
transformation – Aizerman’s and Kalman’s conjecture – Popov’s criterion – Circle
criterion.
5. OPTIMAL CONTROL 9
Introduction -Decoupling - Time varying optimal control – LQR steady state
optimal control – Optimal estimation – Multivariable control design.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. I.J. Nagrath and M. Gopal, ‘Control Systems Engineering’, New Age International
Publishers, 2003.
2. Ashish Tewari, ‘Modern control Design with Matlab and Simulink’, John Wiley, New
Delhi, 2002.


REFERENCES
1. George J. Thaler, ‘Automatic Control Systems’, Jaico Publishers, 1993.
2. M.Gopal, Modern control system theory, New Age International Publishers, 2002.
3. Gene F. Franklin, J. David Powell and Abbasemami-Naeini, “ Feedback Control of
Dynamic Systems”, Fourth edition, Pearson Education, Low price edition. 2002.
L T P C
EE2023 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION 3 0 0 3
AIM
To provide comprehensive knowledge of robotics in the design, analysis and
control point of view.
OBJECTIVES
i. To study the various parts of robots and fields of robotics.
ii. To study the various kinematics and inverse kinematics of robots.
iii. To study the Euler, Lagrangian formulation of Robot dynamics.
iv. To study the trajectory planning for robot.
v. To study the control of robots for some specific applications.
1. BASIC CONCEPTS 9
Definition and origin of robotics – different types of robotics – various generations of
robots – degrees of freedom – Asimov’s laws of robotics – dynamic stabilization of
robots.
2. POWER SOURCES AND SENSORS
9
Hydraulic, pneumatic and electric drives – determination of HP of motor and gearing
ratio – variable speed arrangements – path determination – micro machines in robotics –
machine vision – ranging – laser – acoustic – magnetic, fiber optic and tactile sensors.
3. MANIPULATORS, ACTUATORS AND GRIPPERS 9
Construction of manipulators – manipulator dynamics and force control – electronic and
pneumatic manipulator control circuits – end effectors – U various types of grippers –
design considerations.
4. KINEMATICS AND PATH PLANNING 9
Solution of inverse kinematics problem – multiple solution jacobian work envelop – hill
climbing techniques – robot programming languages
5. CASE STUDIES 9
Mutiple robots – machine interface – robots in manufacturing and non- manufacturing
applications – robot cell design – selection of robot.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS
1. Mikell P. Weiss G.M., Nagel R.N., Odraj N.G., Industrial Robotics, McGraw-
Hill Singapore, 1996.
2. Ghosh, Control in Robotics and Automation: Sensor Based Integration, Allied
Publishers, Chennai, 1998.
REFERENCES
1. Deb.S.R., Robotics technology and flexible Automation, John Wiley, USA
1992.
2. Asfahl C.R., Robots and manufacturing Automation, John Wiley, USA 1992.
3. Klafter R.D., Chimielewski T.A., Negin M., Robotic Engineering – An
integrated approach, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1994.
4. Mc Kerrow P.J. Introduction to Robotics, Addison Wesley, USA, 1991.
5. Issac Asimov I Robot, Ballantine Books, New York, 1986.
GE2021 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS & HUMAN VALUES L T P C
(For Affiliated Colleges under R-2008) 3 0 0 3
1. Engineering Ethics 9
Senses of ‘Engineering Ethics’ – Variety of moral issues – Types of inquiry – Moral
dilemmas – Moral Autonomy – Kohlberg’s theory – Gilligan’s theory – Consensus and
Controversy – Professions and Professionalism – Professional Ideals and Virtues –
Uses of Ethical Theories
2. Engineering as Social Experimentation 9
Engineering as Experimentation – Engineers as responsible Experimenters – Research
Ethics - Codes of Ethics – Industrial Standards - A Balanced Outlook on Law – The
Challenger Case Study
3. Engineer’s Responsibility for Safety 9
Safety and Risk – Assessment of Safety and Risk – Risk Benefit Analysis – Reducing
Risk – The Government Regulator’s Approach to Risk - Chernobyl Case Studies and
Bhopal
4. Responsibilities and Rights 9
Collegiality and Loyalty – Respect for Authority – Collective Bargaining – Confidentiality
– Conflicts of Interest – Occupational Crime – Professional Rights – Employee Rights –
Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) - Discrimination
5. Global Issues 9
Multinational Corporations – Business Ethics - Environmental Ethics – Computer Ethics -
Role in Technological Development – Weapons Development – Engineers as Managers
– Consulting Engineers – Engineers as Expert Witnesses and Advisors – Honesty –
Moral Leadership – Sample Code of Conduct


TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS :
1. Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger, “Ethics in Engineering”, McGraw Hill, New York
(2005).
2. Charles E Harris, Michael S Pritchard and Michael J Rabins, “Engineering Ethics –
Concepts and Cases”, Thompson Learning, (2000).
REFERENCES
1. Charles D Fleddermann, “Engineering Ethics”, Prentice Hall, New Mexico, (1999).
2. John R Boatright, “Ethics and the Conduct of Business”, Pearson Education, (2003)
3. Edmund G Seebauer and Robert L Barry, “Fundamentals of Ethics for Scientists and
Engineers”, Oxford University Press, (2001)
4. Prof. (Col) P S Bajaj and Dr. Raj Agrawal, “Business Ethics – An Indian Perspective”,
Biztantra, New Delhi, (2004)
5. David Ermann and Michele S Shauf, “Computers, Ethics and Society”, Oxford
University Press, (2003)
EE2027 POWER SYSTEM TRANSIENTS 3 0 0 3
AIM
To review the over voltages (or) surges due to the phenomena of switching
operations and lighting discharge. Also to study propagation, reflection and
refraction of these surges on the equipments their impact on the power system
grid.
OBJECTIVES
i. To study the generation of switching transients and their control using
circuit – theoretical concept.
ii. To study the mechanism of lighting strokes and the production of lighting
surges.
iii. To study the propagation, reflection and refraction of travelling waves.
iv. To study the impact of voltage transients caused by faults, circuit breaker
action, load rejection on integrated power system.
1. INTRODUCTION AND SURVEY 9
Review and importance of the study of transients - causes for transients.
RL circuit transient with sine wave excitation - double frequency transients - basic
transforms of the RLC circuit transients.
Different types of power system transients - effect of transients on power
systems – role of the study of transients in system planning.
2. SWITCHING TRANSIENTS 9
Over voltages due to switching transients - resistance switching and the
equivalent circuit for interrupting the resistor current - load switching and
equivalent circuit - waveforms for transient voltage across the load and the switch
- normal and abnormal switching transients. Current suppression - current
chopping - effective equivalent circuit. Capacitance switching - effect of source


regulation - capacitance switching with a restrike, with multiple restrikes.
Illustration for multiple restriking transients - ferro resonance.
3. LIGHTNING TRANSIENTS 9
Review of the theories in the formation of clouds and charge formation - rate of
charging of thunder clouds – mechanism of lightning discharges and
characteristics of lightning strokes – model for lightning stroke - factors
contributing to good line design - protection using ground wires - tower footing
resistance - Interaction between lightning and power system.
4. TRAVELING WAVES ON TRANSMISSION LINE COMPUTATION OF
TRANSIENTS 9
Computation of transients - transient response of systems with series and shunt
lumped parameters and distributed lines. Traveling wave concept - step
response - Bewely’s lattice diagram - standing waves and natural frequencies -
reflection and refraction of travelling waves.
5. TRANSIENTS IN INTEGRATED POWER SYSTEM 9
The short line and kilometric fault - distribution of voltages in a power system -
Line dropping and load rejection - voltage transients on closing and reclosing
lines - over voltage induced by faults - switching surges on integrated system
Qualitative application of EMTP for transient computation.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Allan Greenwood, ‘Electrical Transients in Power Systems’, Wiley Interscience,
New York, 2nd edition 1991.
2. R.D.Begamudre, ‘Extra High Voltage AC Transmission Engineering’, Wiley
Eastern Limited, 1986.
REFERENCES
1. M.S.Naidu and V.Kamaraju, ‘High Voltage Engineering’, Tata McGraw Hill, 2nd
edition, 2000.